Locate Service Centers | Site Map
Login | Browse and Buy | Promotions | Catalog | Line Card PDF | Supplier Diversity | Premium Brands
  Applied Industrial Technologies The website for Applied Industrial Technologies
   
   Products > ... Power Transmission > ProTalk - Power Transmission

 ProTalk - Power Transmission


Chain Drives

Q. What is the difference between a taper lock bushing and a QD bushing?

Q. Why does mattop and tabletop chain come in different colors?

Q. How can I make my roller chain and sprockets last longer?

Couplings

Q. Why does the rubber element of my coupling keep breaking?


V-Belts

Q. Why should I not use cogged belts with large motors?

Q. After I set the tension on a new v-belt drive application, do I ever need to check it again?

Q. How can I reduce the noise in my belt drive application?

Q. What is the difference between a taper lock bushing and a QD bushing?
A. The main difference in the two is that the QD style bushing has a flange around the outside diameter, while the taper lock bushing has straight sides on the OD. Many people refer to both types as a "taper lock" because they both use the tapered wedging action to lock to the shaft. The taper lock bushing, with it's straight sides, uses an internal hex head cap screw to drive the bushing into the bore of the component being installed (sheave, sprocket, etc.). Be careful when installing these screws. The screws go into the blind holes in the bushing that are threaded in the installed component. The holes with threads on the bushing are for removal only. Also be aware that the appearance of a flange on the outside of the bushing doesn't necessarily mean it's a QD style. The Browning Split Taper bushing also has a flange, and the two are not interchangeable. The Browning style can be identified by a key on both the inside and outside of the bushing and the flange is solid. The QD style has a split that continues through the flange.

Q. Why do mattop and tabletop chain come in different colors?
A. The colors represent which application that particular chain should be used for based on what product is being conveyed and what friction factors are required. They come in three basic colors: the gray one is acetal with the most friction; the tan one is low friction acetal with less friction than the gray (most common); and the green is super low friction with less friction than tan.

Q. How can I make my roller chain and sprockets last longer?
A. The best method for increasing chain drive life is to provide adequate lubrication. The chain needs to have enough lubricant to penetrate into the rollers and pins to receive maximum life, and the fit between the rollers and the sprocket teeth must also be lubricated. Chain drives are speed sensitive, and the lubrication requirements vary with speed. At low speed you can get by with manually lubing the chain, but as speed increases, you may need to move up to drip or brush oiling. At high speeds, the drive may need an enclosed guard with an oil bath.

Q. Why does the rubber element of my coupling keep breaking?
A. Often, misalignment is the cause. Most rubber element couplings will only take .010-.062in parallel misalignment and .035-.330in angular misalignment depending on the coupling size. If you know the coupling size, we can determine the maximum misalignment allowed.

The other cause could be horsepower. Again, if you know the coupling size, we can determine whether it is correct for the horsepower.

Torsional flexibility, or "wind-up" as it is commonly referred to, should also be taken into consideration, especially in pump applications where start-up torque can be much higher. For example, in a Martin #6 quadraflex standard rubber insert the wind-up is 15% whereas with a hytrel sleeve it is at 7%. The charts generally show that hytrel will handle much higher horsepower at the same rpm. 10HP at 1750 versus 7.5HP at 1750rpm.

Q. Why should I not use cogged belts with large motors?
A. In applications such as large motor fan blower units where a soft start motor is not available, cogged belts grip too well at start up and can lead to premature fatigue on the belts. Worse yet, it could cause catastrophic damage to other equipment. Non-cogged belts do not grip as firmly and slip enough during motor engagement to prevent premature wear and damage on equipment.

Q. After I set the tension on a new v-belt drive application, do I ever need to check it again?
A. Yes, you can lose up to half of the tension with initial start-up. You need to run the equipment for at least a few minutes and then go back and re-tension. It's ideal if you can go back to re-tension after 24 hours of run time.

Q. How can I reduce the noise in my belt drive application?
A. If noise is the concern and you have the option, switch from a standard belt drive to the Goodyear Eagle belt and sprocket drive package. Because of its herringbone tooth configuration, noise is reduced appreciatively as compared to standard belt drives.




Locations | Terms of Access | Terms of Sale | Privacy Policy | Supplier Terms | Site Map | Home | Return Policy
Copyright © 1999-2014 Applied Industrial Technologies. All Rights Reserved.
Get Acrobat® Reader®